Even they do it

While writing, stories take on a mind of their own. They change directions, and sometimes was have to delete a lot. This is all to create the best story possible, because let’s face it people are harder and harder to please, and it’s hard to sell books.

Incase you write or are already a published and trying to overcome writers block look to Disney for inspiration. If you ever watch their ‘making of’ extras, Frozen, you would see them deviate from their original storyline. This all happened because a character was more likeable than originally planned. It happens to Disney, it will happen to you. It happens to me all the time.

My current new release is a fantasy, something I have never written before. I am very once upon a timeexcited. It’s about Faeries, but not in any way you’ve seen them before. They are my own making. No one says I have to stick to someone else’s made up rules. Well, the story took on a life of it’s own and it turns out the evil character who plays a minor roll in Finding Bell actually has a very large backstory. She needs her own story.

I suppose what makes a great story is that they can grow and evolve to become something people will actually want to read. Never force a story to fit what you had thought, your characters, although in our heads, have very real personalities. Yeah, that sounds a little crazy. No one is allowed to judge a writer.

So just remember, even the largest and most professional companies out there don’t stick to their original ideas and plots. AND THAT IS OKAY.

Happy writing. If you are a reader, happy reading and remember that the book you hold s a heartbeat to every author. Please read it with love.

 

Vanity isn’t Always in the Mirror

Do you know what a Vanity Press is?

Not everyone does and I am not looking down on someone who goes this route, but it is warning to ensure authors understand the risks.

Obviously I am a fan or independent publishers as well as traditional publishers. I have my reasons. Self publishing is a whole new world that is allowing a lot of new books to flood the market. What of vanity presses though?

A vanity press is a ‘publisher’ that requires the author or perspective author to sign a contract that requires them to pay money up front in order for a book to be accepted.* I don’t mean a small amount either. Most request a few thousand. Some request the author to buy a certain amount of books, or to buy others books from the publisher. There are a lot of different ways to identify a vanity press, but the biggest is that your book was not accepted due to merit, quality, plot line, or any other point that most agents and publishers look for.

A indie and or traditional publisher has contracts, but they never ask the author to foot the bill. Some do not pay advances; this is usually an Indie publisher due to their size and is not uncommon nor a red flag to worry about. Royalties should always be addressed, you’re a publishing to make money – let’s not kid ourselves.

If you aren’t sure if the publisher is a vanity press, where you are pretty much paying to have your book printed rather than self publish in ebook first, Google search and look for reviews. I am not saying all vanity presses are bad, some help market even. Just be aware of what you are getting into before you sign over a lot of money that might be lost for good rather than an investment.

*Please know that it is not uncommon for agents to ask for the author to pay their printing of manuscripts that will be shopped around to potential publishers.

Publishing Credits – Flipping the coin

Do publishing credits actual help or do they hurt you?  I had the opportunity to talk with an agent at a small conference recently. She didn’t represent what I wrote, but I was able to ask some great basic questions on the industry.coin  Some days I say, flip a coin to decide what to do next.

Do you want an agent someday?  If you answered yes, read on.  If you answered no, good luck on your mission.

From the agent’s mouth:

The agent I had the opportunity to “chat up” was very polite.  She asked me questions about my writing, to be nice I assume.  In the end she told me that if I want to be agented someday, and I do more then short stories at a small publisher, the number of books sold will be scrutinized.  They will want to know how big the publisher is.  They will want to know the avenues of sale used.  Although agents will understand that most small publishers will not be at physical stores, your sales better be good online.

All that being said, she still seemed to be interested to know that I was trying.  That I had found someone who appreciates my work.  She liked the idea that I was learning the business and building a platform.  Did any of those facts change her statement that she would require any sale info on books that I write independently?  No.  But she had nothing negative to say about getting my feet wet.

That’s from the agents mouth.

From the writers mouth though, I say that going with a small publisher has been nothing short of awesome!  I have changed the way I write.  I have fewer “issues”.  Am I perfect?  No.  Never will be.  The lessons learned though, have been invaluable! I would tell anyone to start small.  A few other authors I know have and are now agented or still independent, but doing well.

Long story short.  Do you love to write?  Then don’t give up and always attempt a few avenues.  Just be aware of the risks that come along with each choice. I’ll post on that later.

 

Here it goes – flipping a coin on what to write next!